Our guest blogger, Terryann Sanders, LMFT, CEDS, has been in private practice treating individuals with eating disorders for the past 15 years. Most recently she co-founded and opened the Eating Disorder Collaborative, a group of independent clinicians that have come together to provide holistic and evidence-based treatment for eating disorders. Terryann provides individual, group and family therapy and facilitates the free monthly Parent Support Group at the EDC.  For more information:  Eating Disorder Collaborative

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Sarah is a 16-year old daughter who is constantly worried about how she looks, often making negative comments about her body, and disappearing into the bathroom after dinner for long periods of time.  You listen at the door but can’t hear anything; maybe she takes a shower or you hear the sink running and you wonder what she could be doing in there.

Troy is a 15-year old son who told you he wants to lose a little weight.  He started eating only “clean foods” and works out every day.  You notice he is seeing his friends less, he is spending more and more time working out, and he no longer eats what the rest of the family is eating.  He complains when he has to do social events or things with the family because he doesn’t want to miss his work out.

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Terryann Sanders, LMFT, CEDS at Eating Disorder Collaborative in Roseville, CA

Does this sound familiar?  How do you know if your child has an eating disorder, and what should you do about it if you think they are exhibiting eating disordered behaviors?  Eating disorders come in many shapes and sizes, and it is not always easy to determine what is eating disordered. Our children get many notions from society that thinner is healthier, that pushing yourself to work out harder and harder (“no pain, no gain”) is good for you, that certain foods or ingredients are “bad”.  Our kids begin to get these messages very early in their development, and it can result in an over focus on body, weight, and food.  Eating disorders and body image disturbance can have a serious negative impact on physical, emotional and psychosocial development. Therefore, it is important to identify problematic behaviors and seek treatment as early as possible.  If left untreated, eating disorder behaviors may become more severe and less responsive to treatment over time.

FREE EATING DISORDER PARENT SUPPORT GROUP

Come and get your questions answered.

NOVEMBER 2, 2019 (First Saturday of Every Month)

10:30AM – 12:00PM

To sign up contact Terryann Sanders

While it is not possible to list all of the signs and symptoms of eating disorders here, the following list may help you determine if it’s time to seek help.  If your child exhibits some of the following signs or symptoms you may want to seek professional advice.

  • Over focus on food, but not eating.  For example, interest in cooking, shopping and preparing food, but rarely eating the food prepared.
  • Making excuses about not being hungry.  For example, “I already ate”, or “I had a late lunch and I’m not hungry”, or “I ate with my friends”, etc.
  • Pushing food around on the plate and not eating it.
  • Becoming pickier and pickier about the type of food they eat.  For example, they stop eating meat, then dairy, then become vegan …
  • Eating in isolation, and fear or discomfort of others watching them eat.
  • Ongoing and excessive complaints about their appearance.
  • Fear of gaining weight, over focus on calories, weight or measuring foods.
  • Distorted body image and misperception of how they look.
  • Loss of menstruation or inconsistent periods.
  • Excessive exercise – unusual movements such as moving around a lot while standing, jiggling body parts, not wanting to sit or be inactive.
  • Misuse of laxatives, diuretics or enemas.
  • Inflexibility and rigid thinking patterns.
  • Perfectionism.
  • Negative self-image.
  • Low self-esteem.
  • Eating excessive amounts of food in one sitting.
  • Consuming an excessive amount of food over a period of time.
  • Going to the bathroom or showering immediately or shortly after meals.
  • Exercising despite injuries.
  • Tendency to compare self negatively to others.
  • History of dieting, finding new diets, going on and off diets.
  • Loss of control over eating.
  • Secretive eating behaviors, eating in isolation, hoarding of food.
  • Increasing social isolation, social problems, lack of friends and-or social activity.

There are many places to seek help if you suspect your teen or adult child is exhibiting eating disordered behaviors.  Eating disorder treatment can range from hospitalization or medical stabilization to outpatient treatment depending of the severity of the symptoms and the needs of your child.  A good place to start is to seek a professional that specializes in eating disorder treatment that can do a full assessment to determine the level of care that your child may need.

FREE EATING DISORDER PARENT SUPPORT GROUP

Come and get your questions answered.

NOVEMBER 2, 2019 (First Saturday of Every Month)

10:30AM – 12:00PM

To sign up contact Terryann Sanders

(BMB-0475)

About:  We are a non-profit education center founded in Roseville, CA to strengthen the parent-child bond in a hyper-connected world. Our mission is to restore families with the mustard seed of faith that declares liberty already belongs to the soul because one God, the Creator of all humanity, grants every human being intelligence and free will to choose what to believe, and that is power that can never be taken, but is easily surrendered to the bully, the drug or the device.

Peace on earth begins with peace at home.

Core Connectivity – A Foundation to Empower Families

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Joanna Jullien, Founder & CEO of Core Connectivity
Photo by: Victoria Hatch

Joanna Jullien is an author, educator and consultant on strengthening the parent-child relationship in a cyber-powered world. She is a former technology executive trained in behavioral science at U.C. Berkeley, a mother of two grown sons, and an author of books for practical guidance on parenting, growing up and family life in the network culture. As a family and technology culture advisor, Joanna has appeared on 103.9FM The Fish, 710AM Keeping Faith in America, 1380AM The Answer, and Examiner.com.